What to Expect When You're Connecting

Smart Solutions Integrating Blended Networks (with John Hubler)

September 14, 2023 Soracom Marketing Season 2 Episode 2
Smart Solutions Integrating Blended Networks (with John Hubler)
What to Expect When You're Connecting
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What to Expect When You're Connecting
Smart Solutions Integrating Blended Networks (with John Hubler)
Sep 14, 2023 Season 2 Episode 2
Soracom Marketing

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We are talking with John Hubler of the BHIOT group about the use of blended networks in smart products and building out device ecosystems. What is a blended network? It's when you're trying to make a bunch of internet of things, devices all communicate, and they're not all using the same Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, Cellular, Satellite, or LoRAWan connection, but need to be on the same network.

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We are talking with John Hubler of the BHIOT group about the use of blended networks in smart products and building out device ecosystems. What is a blended network? It's when you're trying to make a bunch of internet of things, devices all communicate, and they're not all using the same Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, Cellular, Satellite, or LoRAWan connection, but need to be on the same network.

Ryan:

Welcome to another episode of What to Expect When You're Connecting. We're here talking with John Hubler about blended networks. What is a blended network? It's when you're trying to make a bunch of internet of things, devices all communicate, and they're not all using the same Wi Fi, Bluetooth, cellular, satellite, whatever it might be. John, tell me a little bit about yourself and what your relationship with blended networks has been in developing connected products.

John:

Thank you, Ryan. I'm John Hubler with BHIOT Group. Been a partner of BHIOT for four years. Have been consulting for the past eight years. But have been in the industry for close to thirty years. Across several wireless providers, MVNOs. When I hear blended networks, it is a blessing because most companies go out to the marketplace and they have to look for a cellular provider, a BLE provider, a Wi Fi provider. We've built LoRaWAN networks for companies, so a blended network for me, by working with a company like Soracom, allows our company and our clients to have a single pane of glass. While being able to deploy multiple devices across multiple protocols, and that is a blessing in iot.

Ryan:

I would. Suspect that, given some of the background I've done on some of the industrial commercial applications where there's corporate VPNs and there's security elements to some of these deployments that when you are limited to using a private APN with an MNO like you go in, you're basically renting a giant Cisco rack that all your traffic goes through. It doesn't touch any of the other traffic. You're now locked into that MNO. You're going to be having to just use them as your sole carrier. And now you have some lack of flexibility maybe in dealing with different types of deployment areas. Talk to me about some of the constraints that you've come across in deployments that don't have that blended option or multi carrier even.

John:

So the majority of the business being done in IOT is either by a system integrator, a managed services provider. It's very rarely to the end user that somebody isn't involved to bring those networks together. And what I mean by that is you're going to go into, areas where they're just as in coverage for the big three in the United States or somebody coming across from Europe. So what does that mean? It means that you're never really looking at a single pane of glass, meaning that you could look at a Verizon, an AT& T a T Mobile or even a U. S. Cellular or one of the providers from Europe. So when you do it in an environment where that sim, that protocol, that device needs to report back because after all, IOT is about being able to get something to a device. So it reports back to you for that knowledgeable asset environment for you to learn from. And what is it doing could be a generator, could be a tractor trailer, could be to your point in a huge factory. So not one single carrier is going to have coverage in that environment all the time. And very few times Ryan, it's not one warehouse or it's not one factory. They could have five across the country, 30 across the country. So what do they want? They want what we call in the business a single throat to choke. And that single throat and choke is very rarely one carrier in that said market.

Ryan:

So in my experience, having been on the OEM side of the, of this fence, not being with the provider, but having to use providers. I remember one of the largest challenges we had for, it was a discrete remote conditioning, preventative maintenance solution. Did vibration monitoring and you deploy these all over the country. We sold most of the things were through channel. Most of those things were not directly to the end user. So you had to make guesses at which carrier is going to be best. We had all of our kitting costs in our warehouse. We had the exact same gateway, but we had a gateway that had the sticker for AT& T. We had the gateway that was preloaded with Verizon. And then we also had our international version, which had different AT commands preloaded into the gateway. It had a different SIM provider and we're tying up inventory on the shelf. Because we had to pick and choose which one of these SKUs did you want? And that got really cumbersome and created a lot of operational overhead, let alone the administrative overhead of having to maintain different relationships with each one of those carriers. We eventually found a provider who could do some of the billing consolidation, which was great. There's like the Simetric's of the world, which pull everything all in one place, which is. Incredibly valuable for larger fleets or larger deployments. What are some of the operational or administrative hurdles that you've experienced in your years in IOT on that multi carrier or even multi connectivity? Deployment.

John:

Monetarily for SKU management, it doesn't work anymore. You can't continue to service every one of your customers by having thousands of devices only earmarked to one carrier, it just doesn't work. And most people don't know what we're talking about right now when it comes to SKU management and then the facilitation of that SKU. Because you have to program. the A. P. N. You have to program the carrier. You have to program, everything into that device to ensure that it's communicating properly to one singular network. So when you start working with a Soracom and all its tool sets and you're able to have one SKU one device and again, that device has to go through carrier certification. So for argument's sake, if you have a cradle point router And that same cradle point router works the same on every one of those three carriers. You need three different cradle point routers. Because they are tied to that single carrier. With Soracom, one sim, one deployment, single pane of glass, allows you to distribute effectively. And again, look at that monitor for customer care, technical care, and all those attributes. and easily get off that phone, which again, when that call comes in, it's 9 to 10 a minute for that customer service rep. That's a minute, by the way, not an hour. And you have to troubleshoot. And if you can do it with a single pan of glass, which I love saying, then you, it's 90% of the battle.

Ryan:

I completely agree on that one. And what I find fascinating, we'll go up to about 5, 000 feet here is that it's not just Soracom that's unique, but it is a category of mobile virtual network operator, right? If you've got the mobile network operators the big brands that we all see with billboards and commercial phones and iPhones and Androids, they're also in the commercial market, but it's not their sweet spot. They just sell access to infrastructure and an open port to the public Internet, and you're on the hook for all your I. P. Sec. You're on the hook for all of your encryption. You're on the hook for managing all your endpoints and communication back to your devices. It's just a pipe. And what we're looking at is this new class of mobile virtual network operator, your MVNOs there's cloud native. What I love is this. Ability to take what a traditional cellular transaction is, which is signaling and data routing. I didn't know this until I worked for a cellular carrier. I just assumed it's a dumb pipe to the Internet. But, the SIM in your phone, the reason why Jason Bourne is like breaking and snapping all the SIM cards out of his burner phones is because it's just a set of keys to the towers. And that's how towers track where phones are, whether you are authorized to talk to that tower or not, it still can see the radio with that SIM and see it trying to connect. It's just so when signaling happens in fractions of. nanoseconds, it says, Oh, you're allowed on this network. And it knows, and we know how much to bill the owner of that SIM for roaming on our network. That's signaling and that happens super duper fast. So if you're roaming on an orange or Vodafone SIM from France, you get authorized really quickly, but latency. Is it's because it's a second part of the transaction. It's the data routing, right? And so now your SIM and the device is allowed to move data on this network. The traditional mobile network operators give you that open pipe to the internet. And it's going to send your information all the way to France. And then France is going to go back and access the servers that are probably back in the U S and send that data back and forth. And it slows the transaction down. You're just farther away geographically from where the transaction is happening by democratizing last step, these cloud native cellular providers or these full MVNOs have found ways of removing the burden off of your. AT& T and T Mobile and Verizon and move that data routing up into the cloud. They turned racks and racks of server of Cisco servers, these packet serving gateways just like what AWS did for web servers, it's now just compute. And they built all the infrastructure. And so now all the routing happens regardless of whose infrastructure you're using. And this is why you can have this blended network, a packet serving gateway sitting up in the cloud. It doesn't matter if it's a satellite company, if it's the LoraWAN gateway, if it's t Mobile, Verizon, Vodafone from France. As long as that SIM is authorized to use that network, it's then going to use that unified endpoint and route the traffic wherever it needs to go. And the beauty about cloud native is. We already know that there's AWS and Azure data centers all over the globe. And so you're actually accessing data centers in the same region. So it closes that gap. So roaming in IOT plus this virtualized data routing means you're now closer to the data. It reduces the latency and addresses a lot of those traditional challenges that telecommunications infrastructures had before. So now that we're done with the one Oh one, John, how do you take the ability to mix or extend networks using things like lower WAN and other types of networks to create more value for companies and products, knowing that cellular may not always be the. What you need to solve the problem.

John:

Direct Communications, also known as DCS, is one of our clients a great client at that. They've built a lot of services around fleet management. Fleet management, for the most part, you want to be able to track tractor, track trailer, but it has, grown to nose to tail transportation. What do I mean by that? Nose to tail transportation, you want to know exactly how that tractor is behaving. You want to make sure the engine's running efficiently. You want to make sure your driver is not distracted. If it's an over the road driver, you want to have some kind of high bandwidth device in there because, after all, they're parking on the side of our highways and byways and truck stops, and they need infotainment, so they need their Netflix. They want to be able to call home. They want to see their loved ones. Then you get into the really important stuff, which is in that trailer. all the assets in that trailer. So you want to make sure that you have some kind of sensor that's going over BLE to know when that door opens and closes and it's being done by the driver or the company that you're delivering to, you want a sensor for refrigeration management, you want a sensor for load capacity. There's tire pressure monitoring for those 18 wheels to make sure that they're safe and if there's notifications. So the reason why that works really well for DCS is because you'll get a hardwired device. Tracking that tractor to make sure that they're pulling the right trailer across the country or locally. You wanna make sure that drivers safe the freight is safe. And more importantly that consumers like us, they're getting what they ordered from, the Walmarts and the Amazons and the best buys of the world. It never really was nose to tail transportation until multi protocol environments came about in IoT. It was always a one on one. Now you can put BLE devices across that tractor, that trailer, and then when you get to the warehouse, a lot of them are getting sensors and notifications when you back up against that warehouse, when you hit those cushions. And then if it's high value, Some companies are now embracing the fact that as soon as it comes off, it goes on to their network into that warehouse.

Ryan:

John, what you're describing is something that I've been observing for years, is that I've always felt that it's been disingenuous to call IOT an internet of things because that's not what it is at all. It's an intranet of things, right? Each one of these solutions have been like M2M types of solutions where they're on their own closed, individual, discrete solution, all reporting back to their own... Dashboard or email or something like that. And what you're describing is actually that idea of an intranet of things where the, everything from BLE asset tracking, it could be a small device with an accelerometer to detect when something has been dropped. And for those of us that enjoy some sushi grade fish from time to time, when we eat at the restaurant in the Midwest, we want to know that, that cold chain. That literal cold chain, the chain of custody, that fish never dropped below or above 52 degrees for longer than a certain period of time. And where have you seen, are there any other industries other than just transport and asset tracking where you've seen this burgeoning internet of things where different systems are starting to handshake with one another, but still being able to keep things like the operations private.

John:

You're always going to have markets where private networking is going to be bigger and bigger. If you think about the Permian Basin down in, the deep south. You look at some of those oil rigs and so you really have to set up a private network and somebody has to backhaul it. You have a lot of people doing the dirty work, of driving a tractor trailer into the Permian Basin. And I don't mean that as a knock when I say the dirty work, they're hustling. And they're working on these oil rigs and they don't have connectivity. There are no towers out there. So what do you need to do? You need to set up a private network and you need to ensure that all those workers are safe. You need to ensure that everything that's being done on those oil rigs and on those big, just landmass of area you have loan workers. So you want a panic button. God forbid something happens. You don't need a medical emergency. You need somebody to be able to press a button. You need to get all those reports that are going in and out that those rigs are pumping properly. You need to know that all those workers on those rigs are safe as well and that they can communicate. Some of it is done from a closed loop environment. As a private network, but it's coming back over a cellular network and that is private and you hit it the nail on the head. I used to say to people we've gone from the intranet to the internet. Now we're back to the intranet and most people don't know what an intranet was, which was company information going round and round that never traversed, the public network. And we're back to that. History does repeat itself and to me that's a beautiful thing because security is incredibly important to each and every company because you're always going to have data breaches and we've read too many of those and heard too many of those data breaches over the years.

Ryan:

I think that's, you're not wrong, especially when we have all of this social consciousness around tools like generative AI are easier to get ahold of where there's the ability to do, cryptography and people are able to do more and more complex. Cybercrime, even with the social engineering, it means just set products up to succeed from the beginning, which means starting with security as a mindset. And I see most people think of security, especially in the IOT space. I've been in boardrooms and where you're like, okay, let's talk about security. And someone's always Oh, that's going to be really expensive. Like they hear that and they immediately start thinking dollar signs and. What's wild is, I'll say, I hear that, security seems it's going to be a concern. What is it about it that you're most worried about? Because it's not always dollars. They go, Oh, it's not dollars. It's the dollars that we pay people to build and manage. And then when legal has to get involved and then our security compliance officer. And then, if you want to invite IT into this conversation. You be my guest, but now we get to slow the whole process down because meeting their requirements is challenging, right? They're not going to let things onto their network. you have to balance this tap dance, around security and where most people, when I hear them talk about security, there's the, when they're shopping for cellular it usually starts with three things, and then security is the bonus fourth. First, it's coverage. Do you offer coverage where I'm going to be deploying my things? Makes kind of sense, right? Then it's going to be cost. Is the cost going to be at a price point that jives with my business model? The third one is going to be reliability. Knowing that the first two are how I put everyone into the first tier. Reliability is don't make me look bad, right? And so that's where we see in the MV& O space, those that can handle, multi IMSI or multi subscription and multi carrier. There's a strong desire and an identified need where people have had a bad experience, where they've been limited to just one carrier. Or the answer is, we're going to mail a new SIM out for you. Go ahead and swap that out in the field. Yeah, customers don't want to do that and truck rolls are expensive. So reliability is just don't make me look bad, right? Do work as advertised. And the fourth one is part of a choose your own adventure. It's security. And it's only important unless there's a regulatory body, some sort of certified process that needs to be observed, but it's usually either governmental, regulatory, or there is just a high enough risk. Where they know they need to, use VPNs if they're talking cellular, it's I guess we're going to have to bite the bullet and commit to a private APN, which means we're going to be in a RFQ and RFP process that grills every major carrier because you're only going to get one because that APN, that private APN or access point network is going to require making a VPN connection. Commitments on Sims, because it's something like 23 work orders on average or something like that. We have some former MNO employees that that work and they were explaining to me, like, how many people are involved every time a private APN request comes in and in the average time to fulfill it when you figure in legal and contracting. Is the minimum is three months, but it's usually more around six months, all the way outside to 15 months for some of these larger deals in order to secure and order all of the Cisco hardware, build out the racks that you're going to be effectively leasing and all your traffic would go through. And so I think that sounds awful. And I wish I would have known that a lot sooner, but it's not until you actually get into the weeds. That you realize technology is finally changing and blended networks, LPWAN.

John:

We've obviously been around because with three different carriers, the minimum time frame for an APN build was six months and you did have to get the approvals. And then. Finance would get a hold of it. The customer is paying for this, right?

Ryan:

Yeah.

John:

We're talking back in the day, M to M. You do understand that we're only charging like a dollar a sim. So no, the customer is not paying for it because ultimately you want 10 to 15, 000 for that. But the layman in the business, which is 70, 80% of the people that we work with every day. You know what they want to know? Where's my stuff and how much is it going to cost? And can I see it by staring at this screen? And I don't mean to just clearly simplify this, but most of them want to know where's my stuff and how much is it going to cost? And when you start talking about single carrier relationships anymore, it doesn't work. Nobody has ubiquitous coverage and no one ever had ubiquitous coverage. But if you can do that on a single sim and get a hundred plus providers, so you always do have coverage, you're in a better place. Because people don't want to know what store and forward is. And when they get back into the network because they went through a tunnel or over a mountain, you're going to see the dots on the map. And that's a mobile application. Static applications, not so much. But again, it goes back to the beginning of the conversation. Static applications are not a single SIM or a single provider, I should say. Because if you're deploying tens of thousands of generators across the country, you're going to find pockets where a single carrier doesn't work. So what makes sense? a multi carrier device.

Ryan:

And the value proposition on 90% of IOT devices, some of them do just log. And store and forward. But the vast majority of them, the whole point is, the reason why we're adding cellular, the reason why we're connecting this device is the cost of downtime is far greater than the cost to maintain this. When you ask what is the cost of doing nothing? Or what is the cost of an outage? That can be very high, especially like the QSR, the quick serve restaurant industry, right? There's a lot of cellular backhaul on those. So when they're point of sale at a Taco Bell or McDonald's or, even your food truck, maybe not a food truck, but your food court, if that connection goes down, you can't take credit cards that the days of batching credit cards have been over for years.

John:

We don't have those click it machines anymore?

Ryan:

the imprint machines. No, those are gone, so the need for having a live connectivity in so many situations, whether it's asset tracking or point of sale or a medical device, knowing that connectivity is possible and having failover scenarios is absolutely critical. What I'm fascinated by is the future of the blended networks, though, where it's beyond just multi carrier, but where We can now start looking at deploying solutions that talk to one another and have a common way of handshaking, but without putting their entire networks at risk and to your point, it's the ability to add discrete sensing solutions to add discrete data points to create insight into any given scenario and like what you're saying, like the tractor trailer on a truck, whatever is in the back of that vehicle. Is going to require different types of sensors based off what you're hauling. And so there's a interoperability play that the medical world has been dealing with since the eighties, right? With the whole health data interoperability, all the different fragmented EHR systems. And it required government regulation to step in and say, thou shalt be interoperable. The reality is only 10% of the standards are being followed because they're more of a guideline than a rule, but you just meet the bare minimum. There's nothing like that exists in IOT. It's either you're end to end encrypted or you're not like that's the bright line test that I see from a regulatory standpoint. But at what point do these devices become so critical, so operation no fail that we start seeing certain industries, let's use transportation for an example, if it's driver safety and compliance and all these things in which you have to have backup, you failover because all of the systems, these interrelated systems, Have now become reliant on it, right? It's a crutch at some point where it's not a crutch. There's the, obviously the savings or the value is high enough. That's my speculation. The futurist in me is like, when's that going to happen?

John:

Yeah, but you can ask that question, which I definitely understand, but where were we before wireless? If something got cut, everybody was out. So now if the fiber gets cut to the house or to the building, you have wireless. If a storm comes in, The wireless might go down, but you got fiber, so we have choice. And isn't that what we want? We want choice. You want to be able to look at a menu. And then be able to pick what you want back to your sushi in the Midwest. And you want to be able to pick, you want a dynamite roll or you want, whatever it is that you want.

Ryan:

Caterpillar. I would love a caterpillar all right now.

John:

And we can now do that seamlessly. The cable providers are offering wireless. The wireless providers are offering cable. Just, you have your MVNOs now going across multi protocols, or as we're talking about today, blended networks. We wouldn't be able to do this five, ten years ago. Everybody who went into a carrier, the first thing, including myself, I would ask, is it approved on cellular? Is it approved on cellular? We can create environments in restaurants where you have a gateway that is cellular, Wi Fi, LoRaWAN, and Bluetooth. You can count all the people going in and out of that restaurant and you can put a sensor in the refrigerator so all the stuff in there doesn't go bad because somebody left the door open or the generator went off. You can create sensors and put them into the trap so they don't overflow and you know that you have to clean them behind the bar. You can go on and on. And what can you do? You can do that over a singular, multi protocol network like Soracom. By looking at one pane of glass. Knowing that all that information is coming in. So that restaurant owner knows exactly what's going on in his place. I'll even go one step further.

Ryan:

Lay it on me.

John:

Doors are supposed to close at 2 o'clock. Last call, 1. 30. In some markets could be 12, 11. 30, whatever the case may be. That owner can't be in his business 24 7. So he has to rely on responsible employees. Say he closes the door at 2 o'clock, but all of a sudden he sees the beer tap still pouring. There are solutions out there. DCS has a solution for those beer taps to know that they can cut off, that owner can cut off those taps at closing time.

Ryan:

At what point do bar owners that opt into a program, much like car insurance, at what point does someone with a liquor license get a deal on their insurance, Because there's liability insurance. It's pretty high when you have one of those if you are able to, because of the fines and all of the problems that have from over serving, if you're able to monitor When those kegs are being activated, when the pores are happening, I wonder if there's some future play where a technology like that could create some of those same benefits that we've seen in the automotive industry and impact insurance premiums as if we've got, responsible business owner discounts by having some sort of opt in risk mitigation plan,

John:

I'm sure someone can blaze that trail and it's going to happen because it did happen with an OBD two in a car. Are you driving safe for the first 90 days of your vehicle? If so, you get the rate that we negotiated. If not, because you take turns too harshly and you're a harsh break or so on and so forth. I'm sure somebody will blaze that trail someday. And the beauty of it is it's being done over IOT.

Ryan:

Amen to that, man. So if this wouldn't be another episode of what to expect when you're connecting, if we didn't leave with just some sage advice on someone who is looking to do the multi carrier blended networks I'm going to echo. Some of our solutions architects real quickly, and I'll give you a chance to think of what your answer is going to be. I'm channeling Brenna and she would say all your devices, no matter which carrier you're using, make sure your device is PTCRB certified. That's the base level. Carrier certification with an MVNO like Sorcom, you can actually, without having to get any special permission, start testing out your devices on any of the networks that the MVNO can talk to. But before you go into full deployment, make sure you identify which carriers your devices are going to be primarily, Working with and do the carrier certifications as well. They do cost money, but the last thing you want is to be slapped with a charge for disrupting having a device because it didn't meet carrier certification. So if you're planning on being at a very specific part of the country and the bulk of your data is going to go over it, consider doing the carrier certification as well. But you don't have to do that right away, which is something that the carriers will not allow you to do. You have to go through their network certification and then there's even a whole approval process. Like we're going to have 200 prototype devices and you still got to go through legal contracting, go through all of that fun stuff just to get those approved. They'll send out special sims and then you have to go back and get those devices back. And So channeling our solutions architect, that would be her advice that you don't get a skip that part, but man, ramping up is something that you can actually do while you're still figuring things out. But PTCRB is the bare bones,

John:

That's the baseline. I 100% agree. And Brenna and I have had this conversation and I've had this conversation way too many people because most companies think that you only need the certification on the module. need to cert, you need the certification on the finished solution. And if you don't, you're risking your entire deployment of going dark. As much as I agree, I'm going to disagree with what you said that there could be, a fine. Every one of your devices could get shut off. And if you're a distributor, if you're a reseller, and you have a channel program, and you're deploying these puppies out there left and right, and they all go dark because the carrier decided to turn them off because they weren't fully certified,

Ryan:

Forget a fine.

John:

putting your entire business at risk.

Ryan:

Yeah, You don't want to get blacklisted

John:

No.

Ryan:

and neither does any MVNO. There are just as much on the hook if there's problems. So it's not a Oh, there's an issue. You're blacklisted MVNOs. And I know that like our support team watches all of these things. If There's been devices that have gone out, there's been big deployments, they've identified that there are some issues with a particular carrier, and it's usually something in the modem or the firmware, or there could be some sort of update that needs to be made, but there's warnings like, hey, this is happening, here's the region, fix it, and, and that's where it's nice to know that if you're going through this process, you've got a team that can provide you with some of the troubleshooting advice because you'll be dropped as a customer before an MVNO allows themselves to get blacklisted. But this is something that you can walk your way into. Right. anything else that, you feel is worth reflecting on when people are planning on connecting, Blended networks.

John:

I would probably tend to say that we now live in a world where As much as the world thinks that wireless was built on a dumb pipe, it takes billions of dollars to build that pipe to ensure that your transmission is going through, whether it's for voice, data or texting. And don't just look at price, look at the company you're going to business with, look at the entire solution, the environment. Make sure that you have a partner that picks up the phone when you call them. And again, I'm going to go back to what else is being offered within the Soracom environment. And you all, you offer it across a blended network, multiple protocols as we've discussed on this discussion today. But you also know how to parse data. You know how to do it securely. And I can call ten different people in your company. And they all answer the phone and it's not because of John Hubler. I can guarantee that

Ryan:

No, I, you're not wrong. You're not wrong. It's it's fun to know that you've got a bunch of people that are watching one another's backs, and that includes the people that we work with that don't have an email address that says Soracom. John, thank you for having this little conversation. I think there's actually some really valuable takeaways that people can have about what to expect when expecting blended connectivity in their scenarios. If someone wanted to learn more about you and the work that you do, where could they find that?

John:

You can email me at J H U B L E R at bhiotgroup. com or you can call Ryan and he'll forward you over to me.

Ryan:

call, call Ryan. Yeah you can find me on LinkedIn and and then I'll happily tag John and get you guys introduced.

John:

That's a deal.

Ryan:

Awesome. Thank you so much for your time, John. I appreciate

John:

Thank you, Ryan. Greatly appreciate it.

Ryan:

John, what is Soracom to you?

John:

Simplicity.

Ryan:

Give me two more sentences on that.

John:

It's being, again, I've said this for my entire career, single throat to choke. I've referred people over to Brian I love talking to Diane. I love talking to you. Brenna is second to none when it comes to somebody needed for a technical discussion. I'm just in awe when I get on a call with anybody in your team because again, simplicity. I'm not blowing smoke up your keister. It just comes down to being able to go to one person. Ask a question, learn from you, and more importantly, take care of the customers that we're bringing onto your network. And I don't ever get a call back saying, those guys were complete knuckleheads.

Ryan:

I appreciate that.

Smart Solutions Leveraging Blended Networks (with John Hubler)
Story: The operational overhead of managing multiple hardware skus for supporting different cellular carriers
Question - Overcoming Operational and Administrativer Hurdles of Supporting Mulitiple Carriers with Soracom
Question - How do you create value with blended or mixed networks?
DCS Fleet Management Services for Nose-to-Tail Transportation
Private Networking Will Always Have Specific Markets
How Companies Shop for Cellular
Single Carrier Coverage No Longer Works
How Smart Monitoring With Blended Protocols Helps Resturant and Bar Owners Run Their Business Better
Final Advice on Getting Device Certifications
What else to look at beyond price when selecting connectivity vendors
What is Soracom to You? (Bonus)